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A femme guide to butch drinks. Introduction.

February 3, 2009

The first time i had beer is a fuzzy memory of my childhood when my dad let me have a sip of what he was drinking. I didn’t have another sip of beer ’till 19. Turns out that i quite like the stuff, but in my memory (and my kiddie taste buds) it was foul enough to keep me away for quite some time.

The second time i had alcohol (exempting the sip of wine at passover thing) i was probably 17. I was wandering through the living room, desperately thirsty, and saw my dad’s glass of ice water. Which – you see where this is going, right? – was absolutely not water, but liquor. I don’t know what it was – all i  remember is a horrible taste and burning throat. So that didn’t seem very appealing either.

In college i had the good fortune to have friends who were alcohol snobs. Like one who could mix any drink, and had a full liquor cabinet in his dorm by our sophomore year. Dionysus, who only drank the good stuff – at least, by poor college student standards. He’s also the one who introduced me to the old fashioned, which is still probably my favorite drink. Pan, who had an appreciation of everything. All things. Anything from the very worst to the very best (and ranging far beyond alcohol). And who is always willing to share.

Alcohol nerds. Also, nerd-nerds.

Alcohol nerds. Also, nerd-nerds.

What i really appreciate about all of these people – and others – is that getting drunk was never the sole purpose of drinking – which is not to say it wasn’t an important part of the equation. But most of my good friends in college approached drinking from a hobbyist point of view that included an appreciation of the process as well as the result (or from an abstinance point of view, but that’s not really relevant to this conversation).

Oh, and the title? It has been pointed out that my drinking habits are very butch. My drinking habits being primarily whiskey and beer, seldom fruity, and never frozen.

P.S. I also have Ireland to thank. That is, i spent a semester there, during which i drank significantly less than any of the other American students, and significantly more than i had before or have since. I spent quite a bit of time with Bushmills, Guiness, and Harp, gained one (awesome) flask and learned that i can’t stand Stella Artois. Also, i miss the pubs.

Lady Brett

9 Comments leave one →
  1. February 3, 2009 8:06 pm

    My dear Lady Brett,

    Cheers! I’m a little tipsy from the Manhattan I just had before dinner, which is ironic because now I wonder–is it a butchy femme drink or a femme butch drink?

    Frankly, it just doesn’t make sense to me to talk about butch or femme drinks, because these are shiting and evolving categories. If I go to a bar and order a Knob Creek on the rocks rather than a frozen strawberry daiquiri, does that make me less femme? What about butches who think drinking scotch (or beer or whatever) affirms their butchness? Equally problematic, right?

    On a more personal note, I think the Old-Fashioned is a charming cocktail for you.

    OK I’m off to cook dinner!

    xo
    SF

  2. February 4, 2009 10:49 am

    oh, well, mostly i’m joking! i get a bit of a kick out of the utter silliness of gendering something as inane as alcohol.

    your question about using drinks to affirm your gender is an interesting one, though! on the one hand, problematic and stereotyped, but on the other, props of all sorts are a major part of how people perform their gender.

    i had really intended this series to be kind of fluffy, but perhaps it begs a bit more theory as well.

    i have no idea what you mean by it’s being a charming cocktail for me, but thank you =)

  3. freedomgirl permalink
    February 4, 2009 5:30 pm

    yes, my drinking habits are very butch as well. whiskey & beer are my favorites, and gin&tonic or wine are about as girly as I go. I don’t think alcohol should be sweet!

    I agree with sf though, it does seem problematic to gender one’s drinks, much as it’s strange to gender one’s food choices. however, I have a friend who insists that femmes like sweet snacks and butches like salty ones. this is [of course, right?] true of my own household, where I eat cookies and M. eats crisps.

    having done my share of drinking in Ireland and the UK, I can viscerally sympathise with the “drank significantly more than i had before or have since” — I feel like a teetotaller now compared to how much I drank last year, but at no point was I ever able to keep up with my british friends…

  4. February 5, 2009 7:36 pm

    I just mean that the Old Fashioned is endearingly appropriate for you since you can sometimes be a rather old-fashioned girl (in your writing, for example, which I think you know I love). Plus it’s a great cocktail!

    xo
    SF

  5. February 6, 2009 9:39 am

    ah, yes. you’re onto my big secret, you know. the fact that i’m a raging liberal has a lot of folks fooled into thinking i’m not also conservative (and old-fashioned) =)

  6. grrlchef13 permalink
    February 14, 2009 10:30 am

    OMG you two are too funny….stumbled onto this post (not inebriated…) because I also have a nerd-like affinity for mixology. SF’s fave is most definitely fit for a lady. My nearest and dearest friend claims that all southern “ladies” drink scotch or bourbon. Classic, and old fashioned. Myself, being on the other side of the mississipi am a tequila drinker, but LORD only the good stuff and typically only on the rocks. SO what does that make me?

  7. February 15, 2009 11:34 pm

    Sexy! ;-)

  8. February 16, 2009 12:29 pm

    i’ve always thought the southern lady stereotype was very gender-bending. another thought to explore – clearly i’ll have to start writing again.
    and i second sf on that ;)

  9. grrlchef13 permalink
    February 16, 2009 1:40 pm

    Thanks! (blush) Southern women, especially Texans will not hesitate to pull off their peep toe heel and threaten your life with it, but would not think of changing their own tires…My next girlfriend will be a Texan, its some weird uber strong femme thing…(swoon)

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